Chapter 1

History

Learn about history of Clay Litter

Chapter 2

How is made

How Clay Litter is made

Chapter 3

Eco Impact

How Clay Litter destroys our planet

Chapter 4

Social Impact

How Clay Litter destroys communities

Chapter 5

Health Riskcs

Our health is in danger because of Clay Litter

Clay Litter Hurts People, the Planet...and Kitties

Why are you still using cat litter from the 1940’s which is TOXIC for the environment, your kitties, you and your family?

It’s probably because, if you’re like most people, you don’t give the ole’ faithful clay cat litter a second thought. It’s all we’ve known; it’s been a staple in every cat-owner’s household for years. But if you do a bit of research and understand how clay litter is made and what it’s made of, you may think twice before grabbing that 25lb box of clay litter of the shelf.

History of Clay Litter

1940-1947

the first litter box (E-Z Klean Kitty Toilet) is available in stores. Litter boxes are filled with dirt, sand, sawdust, paper, or ashes

early 1950s

Clay litter (Tidy Cats™) is widely available in stores

mid 1980s

scented cat litter is introduced to the market

mid 1990s

non-clay and organic cat litters (wood, corn, straw, hay, coconut skins, newspaper, etc.) hit the market

before 1940

cats do their business outside in the great outdoors

1947

the accidental discovery of clay litter (Tidy Cat) is made by Edward Lowe with the help of Kay Draper

1984

biochemist Thomas Nelson accidentally discovers clumping litter (the addition of sodium bentonite)

1990s

litter made of silica gel crystals is invented

2018

sustainable, biodegradable, eco-friendly TofuKitty litter hits the market

How Clay Litter is Made

The process of making clay litter begins in mountains and hills that were once otherwise pristine.

Engineers identify mineral deposits (clay) which can be 30 to 40 feet below the ground.

Trees, bushes, and other vegetation in this area are then bulldozed and dumped nearby.

Huge holes are dug into the earth and, if necessary, explosives are used to break up the rock to reach the raw clay. Excess soil and rocks are dumped nearby.

The raw clay is dug out of the earth and placed in trucks and transported to the processing plant.

From here, the clay is loaded onto conveyor belts where it’s crushed into smaller pieces.

It then makes its way into giant kilns where it’s baked at temperatures up to 2000 degrees Fahrenheit in order to remove the moisture.

It’s then cooled and crushed into finer granules before being packaged and shipped out to stores.

The clay is then sorted and screened so various sizes of clay particles are included.

Lastly, the clay gets blended with additives like sodium bentonite, dust-controlling agents, and deodorizers before being packaged and shipped out to stores.

Depletion of natural resources and minerals
Depletion of natural resources and minerals
Depletion of natural resources and minerals
Depletion of natural resources and minerals
Depletion of natural resources and minerals
Depletion of natural resources and minerals
Depletion of natural resources and minerals
Depletion of natural resources and minerals

Strip mining impacts

Detrimental to the environment

  • Strip mining is used to create these litters. This process destroys huge sections of natural forest habitat and leaves giant holes in their place, in addition to contaminating natural fresh water sources and displacing wildlife from their homes.

  • Water pollution, loss of biodiversity, soil erosion and pollution, and formation of sink holes are among the worst effects of strip mining on the environment.

Destroying the planet’s wildlife

  • Birds, rodents, and other animals that depend on trees and plants for food or shelter lose their homes or starve to death. Any creatures that actually survive are forced to relocate and find a new homes and food sources.

  • The sediment from this process finds its way into fresh water lakes, rivers, and streams where it essentially chokes aquatic life and further destroys the ecosystem.

* Unsustainable & Toxic

  • * Bentonite clay is non-renewable and isn't biodegradable. Once it’s displaced, it enters a landfill…permanently. Meaning 180,000 dump trucks worth ends up in a landfill each year, and it will never, ever break down.

  • Traditional litters aren’t biodegradable, resulting in over 2 million tons of cat litter sitting and accumulating in the landfill year after year.

  • These litters contain hazardous chemicals like sodium bentonite, crystalline silica, and other toxic additives that find their way into our freshwater sources and contaminate them.

  • Traditional litters aren’t biodegradable, resulting in over 2 million tons of cat litter sitting and accumulating in the landfill year after year.